Sarasota National Cemetary  

Ina Gross Justice Project

Ina Gross Justice Project

 Tom j Gross and Elizabeth Ben Naim aka Lizbeth Benaim, the Gold Diggers.


Tom’s Production of Documents compelled by the Hillsborough County Judge (received October 2014).  The case in which Tom j Gross refused to come to the US. 

By the way Tom J Gross and Lizbeth Benaim should stop their desperate  attempts at extortion. Get a life guys, pay the bills the way the rest of the world does, work. Good luck on your next "investment opportunity" with Thomas J Gross and Associopaths, SUCKER.

Lizbeth Benaim aka Elizabeth Ben Naim: 


- You physically attacked Ina Gross, a 78 year old woman, in October 2011 when she was visiting you, Tom J Gross and your daughter Yulia. 

- Two months later your husband Tom J Gross murdered your mother-in-law Ina Gross. (In our opinion)

- You, Lizbeth Benaim aka Elizabeth Ben Naim, and Tom J Gross purchased your adopted daughter Yulia with monies loaned to you by Ina Gross.   

- Subsequently, YOU have attempted to extort money from  the daughter of Ina Gross. In addition you have attempted to demean her, To no avail. (In my opinion)


See pages referenced below:


p. 288February 16, 2009 letter: Tom writes to his parents: “…my business is going well, except of course that I am not getting paid.”

p. 337-8.  June 17, 2009 – Tom's father is skeptical of Tom’s financial situation and of his truthfulness. He writes to Tom: 
“Are you certain that you have the 70,000 dollars?  Is it yours without further loans?  Why can you not access it before you leave for spain? You know, Tom, I’m getting older and wearier…I just have to sit alone and think about it some more…

p. 522.  April 27, 2010. As Tom's father is dying…Tom's mother writes to Tom:
“Tom, it is so painful for me to see you in a terrible bind…and it is even more painful to know that in my heart that I cannot go on supporting your financial needs. You have a difficult time making a living and we have shared your misery so many times.”
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p. 491.  March 25, 2010 email from Ina Gross to her son Tom.  

Subject Heading:  Adding up.
Ina writes to her son Tom: I would like you to list the various monies that Dad and I (separately) have loaned you in the past. I have some of that information but need to have it in order.  It doesn’t include the current mortgage.  I’m not going to calculate the loss of interest, so please just the original amounts.  I mentioned to you several years ago that I was going to try to reckon this total against the final distribution to you and your sisters in order to play the game fairly.  I have no question but that you agree.

p. 491.  March 26, 2010 email from Tom to my mom:

Dear Mom:
Whatever the exact number is, it (unfortunately) must be a big number.
I can’t accurately calculate.
So let’s just guess: $750,000.
Seems about right.
Love, Tom

p. 515-16.  April 26, 2010.  Email from Tom to his mother begging her for $90.000.  
“And Only you can help me bridge these next 9 months… Mom: I need a total of  $90,000 between now and December 15.” 

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July 6, 2011 email from Tom to his mother:  Tom outlines in several pages his financial duress.   He is “wiped out.” He begs  his mother for money.  (Cited in Exhibit A)

“So, it was only a matter of time before I would run out of money.”
“And with this last wire transfer, I’m more or less wiped out.”
 “Mom, I am presently in my long-anticipated nightmare scenario (which is true literally, metaphorically and financially).  I am begging you. There’s no other word, really.  I’m begging.”


Tom j Gross  wrote:


"Unfortunately, I find myself in the difficult and unusual position that ending my life is the best, and most loving, action I can take on behalf of my family. 


Please allow me to explain.


First, I am healthy and happy. I suffer from no serious disease that I'm aware of, and I'm neither depressed nor unhappy.


I love life. I love nature. I love my wife, and my children, and my parents, and myself.


I love the "miracle" of life. (I use this word inaccurately, as I do not believe in God, or heaven or hell, or any miraculous works of God. 


I love that we love dogs, and that they in turn love us.

I love the fact that women are caring and sexy.


But unfortunately, and here is the tragic and tearful and painful rub, this just isn't the case. I do have responsibilities. And however well I may (or God forbid, may not) be fulfilling my responsibilities as a father, I'm failing terribly in the most important responsibility of all—to provide.



So, without going through any numbers, here are the ugly facts.


I have no more money, and I have no ability to borrow any money. I have known for almost a year when this day was coming, and now it is here.

Also, I have a lot of debts.

Also, I have lots and lots of life insurance, which means that if I die, then there will be a fair amount of money not only to pay off my debts...


Finally, I have a problem with my most important life insurance policy. Specifically, because I've borrowed heavily against it, this policy requires a lot of money monthly (about $2,000) just to maintain itself. Were the policy to collapse, then A) I would no longer have "lots and lots" of life insurance, and therefore I wouldn't be able to provide for my loved ones; and B) the collapse of the policy would result in about a $240,000 non-cash capital gain, which means about a $60,000 tax burden (or more) to the government.


Since I don't have $60,000 then clearly the government would attempt to take my apartment and my car and whatever. The bottom line is that not only, as indicated above, would I have so much less for my loved ones... 


So, the financial decision is clear. Either I remain alive, and the policy collapses, so that there is much less money (I mean MUCH less money) available if/when I should pass away, AND there is the risk that we will lose our apartment, OR I do what I'm supposed to do, which is to provide for my loved ones.


Unfortunately for me, providing for you requires my death.

I don't like this fact, but it is inescapable."


Eytan Gross